Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Crispy Almond Pancakes (GAPS-legal, grain- and gluten-free)

Mmmm, pancakes.  Hot off the griddle, these pancakes make a great breakfast.  Cold from the fridge, the leftover pancakes make a great snack.

Crispy Almond Pancakes
Serves 3-4
2 cups almond flour, preferably from crispy nuts
4 Tb (half stick) butter, softened
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp celtic sea salt
2 Tb honey
1/2 cup milk kefir
4 eggs, preferably from pastured hens
  1. Combine all ingredients using an immersion blender (or countertop blender). This pancake batter will be quite thin.  
  2. Heat a griddle or skillet over medium heat.  You'll know it is ready when a drop of water sizzles immediately.  
  3. Because the batter is very thin, it won't work well for making large pancakes.  Use a 1/8 cup or medium scoop to measure out the pancake batter, and cook the pancakes in butter over medium heat.
Top these pancakes with butter and raw honey or jam.  Serve with a glass of raw milk or milk kefir plus a side of bacon. Tasty!

This post is part of Monday Mania at The Healthy Home Economist, Pennywise Platter at The Nourishing Gourmet, Fight Back Friday at Food Renegade, and Real Food Wednesday with Kelly the Kitchen Kop!

23 comments:

C and G said...

These look amazing!!! Can't wait to try them as soon as I can add honey and eggs back into the mix!

By the way - I love your site and the recipes that you post - they are fantastic!

Sarah Smith said...

Thanks C and G! I hope this recipe works well for you when you are able to try it.

Tara said...

Hi! I have wondered about using kefir/yogurt and such in cooked items, since I thought the heat would probably kill the friendly bacteria/yeasts. Your thoughts? On a related note, I've wondered if freezing does any damage to the probiotics in these products; for instance, if I use yogurt or kefir to make frozen yogurt in an ice cream maker, does that remove the benefits of the probiotics by destroying the good "bugs," or do they survive the temperature extremes of heat and cold. I've definitely heard that heat is an issue, but not so sure about freezing.

Sarah Smith said...

Hi Tara,
Yes, the heat will definitely kill the probiotics in the kefir. 118 degrees F is the magic number; heating above that temp will kill the bacteria. But, if you are on GAPS, you should still use kefir in baking as the process of making kefir digests all of the lactose in the milk (and lactose is not GAPS-legal).

Freezing does not kill the probiotics, so your frozen yogurt (or kefir) should still give you a good source of probiotics.

Tyler and Kathryn said...

Grain free pancakes, what a perfect Saturday morning breakfast! I can't wait to try them, although I will try using hazelnuts since I have an intolerance to almonds. Thanks!

Tara said...

Thanks, Sarah! Just to clarify, you mentioned that the process of making kefir digests all of the lactose, but this would also be true for homemade yogurt, right? I just made goat milk yogurt, cultured for about 23 to 24 hours, and it turned out well (used Yogourmet starter because that's what I could access quickly); however, I also made goat milk kefir using the Body Ecology powder culture, and I'm not sure about it. The kefir isn't very thick, and it didn't seem very tangy after the allotted time, but I went ahead and put it in the fridge as directed. Pulling it out of the fridge today, it seems to have separated a bit (non-homogenized goat milk does that, I think), and I gave it a slight shake to try to incorporate it a bit, and it did get a little fizzy. So perhaps it really did culture properly even though it looks a bit odd and doesn't taste very tart. I guess if I try to use it in something like this pancake recipe, it would be okay since it will all get blended up anyway.

Sarah Smith said...

Hi Tara,
Yes, if the homemade yogurt is cultured for about 24 hours, all of the lactose is digested as well. I don't have any experience using kefir powder as I just use grains. But if it is fizzy, it sounds like it is indeed done. Either one should work great in this recipe.

Lindsay said...

These look great!

Alicia@ eco friendly homemaking said...

Oh these look so delicious! I am off to read some more of your posts!!

Kelsey said...

@Tara - I have read that kefir powder is not as beneficial as kefir grains, I think because there aren't as many probiotics in the powder...

Question - this is slightly off topic - but does anyone know the best way to season a cast iron pan? The method I have read uses flax oil, but does it really matter what type of oil is used? I'd rather use coconut, as I don't use flax oil and it's expensive so I don't want to buy it just for this... Any ideas?

Sarah Smith said...

Coconut oil should work great to season a cast iron pan. I would NOT use flax oil, as it's high omega 3 content makes it go rancid if heated. Any high temp oil should work well, such as refined coconut oil, sunflower, etc.

gluten free pancake recipe said...

Thanks for supporting the gluten free family.

MommaSkinner said...

Just made them and substituted almond milk for real milk for now. Came out yummy! Thanks for the recipe!

Sarah Smith said...

MommaSkinner - Great! Thanks for letting me know.

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much for this recipe! I make it with blanched almond flour, add a 1/4 teaspoon of almond extract, and use ghee instead of butter. They come out perfect every time, they're quick and easy to make, and they're sooo delicious with fresh strawberries and maple syrup. We're so grateful for our new weekend breakfast staple. :) -Amie in SF Bay Area, California

Sarah Smith said...

Wonderful, Amie!

Karissa said...

You are incredible!! I'm in LOVE with your blog, and I am currently in the process of going grain free! I have heard (from only one person, honestly) that going grain free-cold turkey style can cause a legitimate gluten intolerance? Is this true? do you know? Not that I really think it matter much since I'd like to eliminate grains from our diet completely anyhow... but I was curious, and haven't found much in my searches... except the benefits of GOING grain free! I wish I had known about you when I lived in El Paso TX, I'm a homeschooling mama myself and think we would have gotten along amazingly. Sorry, mostly off topic, these pancakes were incredible. Thank you for your blog!! <3 Karissa, Anchorage AK

Sarah Smith said...

I'm glad you like the recipes, Karissa!
I've never heard that going grain-free can cause gluten intolerance. However, in my family's experience, going grain-free can make you more aware of existing food intolerances. Dr. Natasha Campbell McBride describes it as the unmasking of symptoms that have long been hidden by so many different food reactions.
Oh, I love Anchorage! I traveled there to teach a class back when I was working in 2005. Such a friendly and beautiful city!

Anonymous said...

I made these for the first time this morning. I used Almond Meal and Almond Milk. The texture was very different but i enjoyed them very much. They were a bit crumbly but think that has to do with using the Meal in place of the flour. I think next time I make them I will reduce the amount of Meal to see if that helps.

Anonymous said...

What could be used in place of kefir?

Sarah Smith said...

Plain whole milk yogurt could be substituted for the kefir.

MamaWestWind said...

These are super yummy! We've made them several times now. My super picky Michael even loves them.

Sarah Smith said...

Yay, I'm so glad the recipe worked well for you and your boys!!