Sunday, March 4, 2012

Frugal and Healthy Shampoo Alternative: Baking Soda and Apple Cider Vinegar

For the last 8 months, I've been off shampoo and conditioner.  For years, I'd been using "organic" shampoos and conditioners, but they are so expensive and I had a hard time finding one that worked well for my hair (especially since I only wash my hair every other day).  When I started seeing all the blogging craze about not using shampoo, I decided to give it a try. Now I use baking soda to wash my hair and apple cider vinegar to condition it, and I'll never go back to storebought products!

Why ditch shampoo and conditioner?
  • Conventional shampoos and conditioners are loaded with chemicals.  These chemicals can be absorbed through your skin, and thereby contribute to health problems.
  • Organic shampoos are very expensive, and many of these still contain questionable ingredients.
  • Washing your hair with shampoo can strip your skin of its own natural moisturizers.
  • Baking soda and apple cider vinegar can make your hair look great, and even reduce the number of hair styling products that you need. 
How to use baking soda and apple cider vinegar instead of shampoo and conditioner 
Make the baking soda and apple cider vinegar mixtures:
  1. Thoroughly clean out an old shampoo bottle and and an old conditioner bottle. 
  2. In the shampoo bottle, add 1 Tb baking soda for each 8 oz (one cup) of water.  In the conditioner bottle, add 1 Tb raw apple cider vinegar for each 8 oz (one cup) water.   A funnel is very handy for preventing a mess if your bottles have small openings.  
  3. Add water and fill to the top of each bottle. Put the lids on and shake well.  
How to use the baking soda and apple cider vinegar mixtures:
  1. Wet your hair.  Apply the baking soda mixture to your scalp and roots.  I like to just run the shampoo bottle all along the top of my head, which lets a trickle of the solution out. There is no need to apply it all the way to the ends of your hair.  Use your fingertips to scrub your scalp.
  2. Thoroughly rinse the baking soda mixture from your hair.
  3. Apply the apple cider vinegar mixture to the scalp and roots of your hair.  Once again, there is no need to apply the mixture all the way down your hair. Massage the mixture into your scalp  and let it stay on for a few minutes.  
  4. Thoroughly rinse your hair.  Then rinse it some more. Sometimes, the vinegar solution will grow some tiny SCOBY strands (these are like what is used to make kombucha), so you need to rinse your hair very well to make sure no little bits get left behind.
The dreaded transition period
I started out my no-shampoo experiment by trying to use nothing on my hair, just a nice hot rinse while scrubbing with my fingertips.  I had heard that it can take 1-to-4 weeks for the scalp to normalize oil production (since the scalp wants to make more oil after using shampoo that has stripped the natural oils from your skin). I really wanted the no-product method to work, but my hair got so oily during the second week that I had to give up on it (I was embarrassed to leave the house with such a greasy head). I'm sure it didn't help that it was the middle of summer, when my hair tends to be more oily anyway.

Then I switched to using baking soda and apple cider vinegar, and the transition period was much more manageable. I did find it beneficial to wash my hair every day during the transition period. And now I'm back to my usual method of washing my hair every other day, and it works just fine.  My hair is actually less oily on the second day than it used to be since my scalp isn't trying to compensate for having all the natural oils stripped from it.

Make sure you try this method for at least a month to give it a fair shot.  And be prepared for the fact that your hair will probably feel different using this method than it did using shampoo.  My hair feels more soft now, and it also never feels quite so squeaky clean as it did with shampoo.  I also find that I don't need to use as many hair products to make my hair look nice (previously, I tended to have lots of fly-aways, but there are many less now).  Using baking soda and apple cider vinegar also seems to emphasize the natural curl of my hair.

How to modify the method depending on your hair type
Depending on the time of year and how long my hair is, I modify the baking soda and apple cider vinegar mixtures to make them work better.  For instance, in the winter, my hair tends to be more dry, and in the summer it tends to be more oily. It is very easy to tailor the baking soda and apple cider vinegar mixtures to meet the needs of your hair.
  • If your hair seems overly dry, try one of the following:
    • Decrease the amount of baking soda
    • Increase the amount of apple cider vinegar
    • Decrease the length of time you leave the baking soda mixture on your hair
    • Increase the amount of time you leave the apple cider vinegar on your hair
  • If your hair seems overly oily, try one of the following:
    • Increase the amount of baking soda
    • Decrease the amount of apple cider vinegar
    • Increase the length of time you leave the baking soda mixture on your hair
    • Decrease the amount of time you leave the apple cider vinegar on your hair
Have you tried any natural alternatives to shampoo?  What were the results?

68 comments:

  1. I am going to do this. I stopped using shampoo a few years ago and am tired of paying a small fortune for all natural conditioner. Thanks for the specifics on how to make this work.

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  2. I love washing my hair with baking soda and vinegar! I do use a lot more baking soda than you, though. I find that it works best for me to fill my bottle up with baking soda and then add water as needed to make a really thick mixture. I have really oily hair so I guess I just need more baking soda.

    The only thing I'm disappointed about is that I still have to wash my hair every day or it looks really greasy and gross. I've been washing my hair like this for almost two years now so I think it's just not going to happen. Apparently I have just have hair that's more oily than most people.

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  3. I have a somewhat similar hair washing routine. I use a sea salt and baking soda solution to wash my hair. I have curly hair and noticed years ago that my hair always looks great after I swim in the the ocean, hence using the sea salt to wash my hair. I always have a lot of extra kombucha around the house, so I started using that as my conditioner. It works great and really brings out the curl and shine in my hair.

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    Replies
    1. Oh, sea salt sounds fantastic! I'll try adding some to my baking soda solution. I sometimes use kombucha vinegar in place. Of the ACV, and it works just as well. I think using straight vinegar or kombucha would make my hair a bit too greasy, but everyone's hair is different.

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    2. How much sea salt should I add?

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  4. I'm going to assume that those of you using this technique don''t color your hair?
    My hairstylist uses a specific formaldehyde-free organic formula and at 38 am really gray and I'm not going to change coloring my hair for now. Ten years ago I had bo derek type braids put in to go camping all summer and while my scalp ITCHED (used lavender, tea tree and witch hazel) for 3 weeks really badly, ever since, I only wash my hair once a week to 9 days. I have had long and short hair both in this time. Sure my hair doesn't loook the same everyday, but with the priority being to keep my own oil production in my hair - but also in check - I am ok with the different looks. But I guess my question is - does anyone do the baking soda and acv with colored hair?

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    Replies
    1. Aren't sulfates the culprit in fading color treated hair? I'm interested in trying this even though I color and see what happens. I would think the less often you wash your hair, no matter what you use, the better for the color.

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    2. I color my hair and use baking soda and vinegar ( I also sometimes use rhassoul clay, but not often, as it is quite messy!). The colour doesn't fade any faster than with shampoo...( actually, when I have to re-dye, it is because of the roots, not the fading). I also wash it only once a week (or less if it still looks clean)

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  5. Great post! Lots of helpful details. I liked reading about your transition period. Seems like it will be especially great for my GAPS son.

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    Replies
    1. Great, Laurie! I find that, for my young kids, I don't need to use anything at all on their hair. Their hair is never greasy, even without ever using anything like shampoo or conditioner. The only time I wash their hair is if they get something in it, like food, or if they've been sprinkling sand in their hair from the sandbox.

      And for tangles, we use a hair brush that has a combination of boor bristles and plastic for my daughter, and it works wonderfully to get the tangles out of her hair (she has thin hair like I do, though, and I've heard these type of brushes don't work very well for thick hair). This hair brush is wonderful because it doesn't seem to ever hurt while I use it, like plastic combs and brushes do. We bought the brush at Target and it is Goodie brand.

      I'm sure, though, that if your son is older, the baking soda/ACV could be a good solution.

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  6. Love this post! I'm planning to try this for my curly hair, but I'm wondering how you deal with the flyaways and tangles? I use a natural mousse for control after shampooing, but I'd love to know if there is another option for me so I can save some money in that regard too. What kind of natural alternative do people with my hair type use for control of frizzies?
    Would love to know how this works for colored hair too!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Linda. My hair is somewhat curly, but it is not long (never past my shoulders) and fairly thin; so, I never really have a problem with tangles. But hopefully someone else who has tangly hair will respond to you!

      I do typically use a small amount of Giovanni Hair Changer after I shower while my hair is still wet. This is a very lightweight product (it looks like water and is very thin) that just smooths my hair a bit and helps with tangles; one bottle easily lasts me about a year because I only need to use a teeny tiny bit. (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001ET78C4/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=nourisheda-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B001ET78C4)

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    2. Linda, I have curly hair. Downright unruly Irish hair. And this works amazing for me. Been doing it for a year and a half now. My trick is two fold. I do an initial ACV rinse (letting it sit for a minute or two) before the baking soda, then after the second ACV rinse I rub a little coconut oil on the ends of my big tooth plastic comb. It goes through my hair like butter (but not without the coconut oil!). Then I rub a SMALL amount into my hands and get the longer parts and ends a bit more. I let this sit while I shave my legs, then rinse. In the fall I'm more frizzy and find I need to do a tiny bit more oil to my ends once I'm styling my hair. It dries naturally, then I give it a little fluff with the hair dryer to feel stylish. :) You could try the coc oil trick first and see if that's enough, then add the extra ACV rinse if needed.
      ~Lynda, too

      Oh, and a crazy tip I discovered: Every once in a while I go a little overboard with the vinegar and I can smell it in my hair. If I waft an open container of baking soda around my head a few times, it takes it away.

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    3. Realized I should add something to this. I do the rinses over all my hair, not just the scalp, otherwise my frizzy curls don't benefit. But, like Sarah talked about lessening baking soda if your hair is dry, I find it very important to not go overboard with the baking soda or my curls dry out and then are more frizzy. I back off if I notice it getting dry after two washes. The vinegar softens my curls so they aren't kinky and frizzy. I only need the baking soda on the long part to counteract the vinegar smell. Also, I've learned to not work my fingers through the long parts unless there's vinegar or coconut oil on my hair, otherwise there's a weird pull that makes my hair pull out. (I've had problems for years with my hair falling out, and this system has helped a lot.) Hope all this can help someone else. :)

      ~Lynda

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  7. a drop of apricot oil is great for fly aways

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  8. so i'd like to know a few smaller details about this routine. 1) do you store your BS shampoo in the shower like one does with store bought shampoos and conditioners? 2) do you shower every day to rinse oils and dirts off your skin but not wash your hair? 3) have you tired making your own face wash with similar ingredients?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I store both the BS and ACV mixtures in the shower. I only shower every other day; you can read about why here:
      http://nourishedandnurtured.blogspot.com/2011/08/reducing-need-for-body-lotion.html

      I haven't tried making a face wash yet...

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    2. thank you for answering my Q's so quickly =) here is an recipe and directions from a National Geographic article i found for face wash and exfoliant http://greenliving.nationalgeographic.com/use-baking-soda-natural-cleaner-face-2832.html - it looks good to me!!

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  9. Flax seed gel (you can google it; I use 1 or 1 +1/2 Tbsp whole flax seeds per 1 cup water, boiled 10 min and strained IMMEDIATELY) is an excellent, natural way to control fly-aways :) The nice thing is, you can use a lot and if your hair ends up looking too "gelled", you can just scrunch it and the crunchy look softens to a more natural look. Plus no alcohol to dry out my hair :)

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  10. i have been using this new routine for the last 2 weeks and my only issue i seem to be having now is the static! i hate static-y hair, and if anyone else reading this has any ideas i would love to read anything! OH and by the way, i have turned about 4 other people onto this routine just in the last 2 weeks, and i am STILL in a transition period, so my crazy hair isn't a deterrant at all hahah.

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    Replies
    1. Well its not organic but dryer sheets work really well =)

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  11. Is there any point in doing this for hair that's been over bleached and has broken off somewhat? My hair is a mess and i want to grow it out and start over because of a hair disaster directed by a "professional". Will it just add to the dryness and breakage? Thanks

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    Replies
    1. I don't find this regime to dry out my hair, so it seems like it should be fine for yours. I'm guessing you may need to up the vinegar which helps soften the hair.

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  12. hello there, i've been hearing a lot about the "no poo" method and I'm trying to figure a way on how to slowly start to get there. I have virgin black hair and I'm kind of wondering if this method won't lighten my hair? because I really don't want that..
    also, if this alternative is okay to use after you've done natural hair masks such as coconut cream or banana/avocado?
    thanks

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    Replies
    1. I have dark brown hair, and this does not seem to lighten it at all ( and I've now been using this method for a year). I've never used a hair mask, but this no poo method seems to work fine with everything for me.

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  13. hi sarah,
    do you think we can use this shampoo and conditioner on coloured hair.

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    Replies
    1. I searched around a bit on the net, and found several people using this method with colored hair. So it wounds like it should work well for you.

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  14. Hi, I have pretty flaky hair... I have been doing this O+V method for about a month now. At first it seemed to be better for my scalp (I think it is dry), but lately it seems to be a little worse. I read on a different site that you SHOULDN'T put the vinegar on your scalp, so maybe that's the problem... Do you have any suggestions?

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    Replies
    1. Since it has only been a month, your hair/scalp could easily still be in the transition period when it is getting accustomed to normal sebum production.

      The vinegar actually acts as a conditioner, so it doesn't make sense to me that it would dry out the scalp more. Especially when it is so diluted with water.

      Delete
  15. awesome! Off to try it now! My sister has been doing this for awhile too!

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  16. I've been doing this for about a week. My hair looks amazing! I have fine brown hair with a natural wave, no color/treatments.

    I keep a tbsp in the shower, as well as an 8oz nalgene squeeze bottle with "cone" lid (bought at container store).

    I put 1 tbsp of baking soda in the bottle before I get then the shower. Once in the shower, I fill the bottle with warm water, cover the tip with a finger and shake it. I apply the mixture to my hair. Then, I do the same with the ACV.

    I used to use a spray leave-in conditioner (giovanni), but now I don't have to use anything else in my hair.

    If my hair gets a little dry at the ends, depending on the weather, I use a teensy bit of oil (jojoba or olive...) on the ends (apply to palms & smooth through).

    I use Bob's Red Mill baking soda, Bragg ACV, and I just got a whole house water filter. Before that, I had a shower filter bought at the Vitamin Shoppe. I have the hair I always dreamed I should have!

    ~maria

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  17. For so many years, I have been shampooing daily because my hair is very oily. I never thought it is the too much shampooing that is causing this! My hair has gotten so thin because of this. After reading this post, I started the routine using baking soda and ACV. I am in my 4th day now and I find my hair to be less oily for sure! I can't believe it.. I have so much hope that I can re-grow my hair thicker and healthier. Thank you so much! ~Marilou

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  18. To the poster with flaky scalp: my husband uses ACV on his scalp and he thinks it's the best thing ever. He's tried so many other products for dry, itchy, flaky scalp. Now he just puts ACV in spray bottle in the shower. He shampoos daily but doesn't use conditioner. Once a week he sprays (after shampooing) w/ the vinegar. He also uses some neem oil once or twice a week & swears it's the best treatment. We buy Dr Hauschka neem hair oil & love it. It's not as smelly as the straight neem oil.

    I have alway had dry hair but after moving to the west my scalp is very oily. I switched to organic paraben/ sulfate free shampoo and conditioner but nothing works. My hair is always dry at the ends & my scalp is always oily. I color my hair red so when it gets oily the roots are very noticeable. I'm going to try this baking soda vinegar method & see how it goes. I'm anxious to try pretty much anything. I'm only 30 but my hair is already falling out. Thanks for this post.

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  19. I am very interested in trying this technique. Do I just jump in and begin using the mixture? Or do I go without shampooing for a while. I read about the transition phase and I am wondering if that is just referring to my hair adjusting or if I need to slowly transition to the Baking soda and ACV mixture. Also, I know you said adjust it to your specific needs, but do you use 1Tb for each wash?

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    Replies
    1. Also, I forgot to ask, do you rinse with warm water after each application, and use them as a shampoo and conditioner? I have heard of people using the ACV as the rinse for the baking soda.

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  20. Just jump in and start using it right away. I mix up a bottle with the baking soda mix and one with the ACV mix. I dispense some from each bottle whenever I wash my hair. With short hair, each bottle probably lasts 5 washes. With medium length hair, each bottle lasts me about 3 washes.

    And yes, I do rinse with water after both he baking soda and the ACV.

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    Replies
    1. Great!! Thank you so much, I can't wait to try it in the morning!

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    2. I have used this method for years as my mother was a greeny well before her time. To avoid the smell of the vinegar I fill a large clear glass jar wide mouthed, with rosemary cuttings. Pack it fairly full then fill the jar with vinegar. You can use any type. Apple cider is bestbut if you're on a budget white will do. Leave the jar in the sunlight for a couple of weeks. The sun warms the vinegar and the oil from the rosemary infuses the vinegar with its scent. The oilis not detrimental to those of you with oily hair. I only use one tablespoon of this in a litre jug of water. I have waist length thick hair which stays very healthy. Sea water is good too for your hair, for those that use that method.
      I also wash my dogs coat with this method too and she has no skin problems.

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  21. Thanks to all, specially Sarah for posting such specific info. I have thin brown somewhat oily mid length waves and started using antidandruff products that have made it worse, so am looking very forward to the results. W
    ill also be starting this tomorrow.

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  22. so decided to start this today. i used baking soda and regular white vinegar. i was wondering if i could use the baking soda and then a natural conditioner (like from deva curl or sheamoisture products) instead of the vinegar??

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    Replies
    1. You could try it and see. The only thing is I'm not sure whether or not the baking soda "shampoo" is strong enough to remove a heavy conditioner.

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  23. I've been using the baking soda and (white vinegar) wash for 2 1/2 weeks now. I've tried it before, but was left with severe residue. Here's what I've been doing different than the last times. RINSE!! A lot! Wash hair as mentioned (with soda) in posts above. Then rinse VERY well (dont miss hair at the temples). I used warm water. Rinse with diluted vinegar a couple of times (catch vinegar rinse in bowl by leaning over edge of tub). Using a hand held showerhead works best. Rinse vinegar out with water. Again, rinse with vinegar a couple more times. Then finish with water rinse.
    What I found was that when I was rinsing the vinegar out, I could see the residue from the soda flowing into the hair trap on the drain. It was white. The second rinse removed the last of the residue.
    From what I could come up with in research, apple cider vinegar was more conditioning than regular vinegar. I didn't need extra conditioning. I have fine, flat hair (translate=oily).


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  24. I have color treated hair too. I'll give it all a shot and see what happens. My main question is, has anyone used essential oils to scent the shampoo? I love a good smelling shampoo/conditioner. That would be the one thing I wouldn't want to give up.

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  25. I used baking soda as poo alternative and apple cider as conditioner but when it's dry the tips of my hair so frizzy and I can't managed to comb it :((((((( WHY?????????

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    Replies
    1. I'm not sure. You may want to try skipping the baking soda and using only the ACV...

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  26. Hi there, thanks so much for your information. I have started using this method this week, and am quite happy with the results. I initially was looking for a shampoo soap as a way of doing away with those expensive shampoos and conditioners and having endless amounts of plastic bottles. I think I am saving around $20 a month now, with not having to buy shampoo and reducing my carbon footprint as well. So thanks to you for starting this blog ! Penny from Australia.

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  27. I have thick, dry, frizzy hair with a lot of different curly textures. I've been flat-ironing my hair for about 12 years now, and I am just so over it!! I'm trying really hard to embrace my natural hair, and I'm basically trying to rehabilitate it by treating it extra nice and natural from here on out :) I'm hoping that my curl pattern will improve and have less frizz.

    Using ACV seems to help a lot- I've only tried it a few times here and there. My question is: HOW OFTEN SHOULD ACV BE USED? Is it a once a week type thing? Will it dry my hair out if I use it too much? Thanks for your help and informative posts!

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    Replies
    1. I use the ACV each time I wash my hair with baking soda, which is every other day. The baking soda actually is more drying, the ACV is more of a conditioner. If your hair seems overly dry, try one of the following:

      Decrease the amount of baking soda
      Increase the amount of apple cider vinegar
      Decrease the length of time you leave the baking soda mixture on your hair
      Increase the amount of time you leave the apple cider vinegar on your hair

      Delete
  28. It would be a great alternative. And more cheaper I supposed.

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  29. I wanted to thank you for this excellent read!! I definitely loved every little bit of it. I have you bookmarked your site to check out the latest stuff you post.

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  30. Great info! I've never heard of using these as shampoo and conditioner. I've been using diluted castile soap and I just don't like how my hair feels really. I like it better than the natural shampoo particularly since it's cheap but eh. I will definitely try this! I've recently started doing the oil face wash and it is a dream. I never realized my face was any color other than raw red! (And I use natural soap!)

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  31. Hi:

    Do you know if this can be used on tight-curled/kinky hair? Pls. respond. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Some of the other commenters on this post said it worked fine on their very curly/multi-textured hair. I searched a bit on the web too, and found others with kinky hair who use a similar method. Give it a shot! If your hair is very dry, I would recommend doubling the amount of ACV and halving the amount of baking soda. Sme people also mention adding a very small amount of coconut oil to their hair after the ACV rinse. Good luck, and let me know how it goes!

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    2. Thank you very much, when I try it I'll let you know. I do have coconut oil, so, that may be a great solution!

      Delete
  32. I love your troubleshooting tips. Simple & helpful ways to figure out the perfect ratio for our hair.

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  33. I'm very interested in trying this. I have permed hair. Has anyone tried this with a perm. Also, where do you find raw ACV and why does it need to be raw? Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. I don't know for sure if the ACV "has" to be raw, but that is what I use and am happy with the results. Sorry, I can't answer your question about perms with any certainty, but I would think it would work fine...

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  34. Also, do you use any products like hair spray? I washed my hair today with the baking soda and ACV (not raw) and it seemed to have cleaned out the gel and spray I had in it. My hair is permed, has anyone had experience with permed hair and getting perms after switching to this? Thanks again.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I talk about hairspray towards the end of the article...

      Delete
  35. PLEASE!!! Have you got any tips for thinning hair? I am 65 years old with SUPER FINE hair, and it is thinning even more every day. I do not use perms, colors or conditioners and do not curl my hair - - just wash it and towel dry, comb into style and go. I keep it short. I have used AC vinegar for a conditioner and final rinse since I was a child. I read something about onion, but have no clue what this is about. Do I rub it on my scalp??? Does it work?? HELP!!!

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    Replies
    1. For me, making sure my adrenals.thyroid are healthy has helped lots with hair falling out. When my adrenals were at their worst, there was lots of hair on my pillow every morning, now hardly any if at all.

      http://nourishedandnurtured.blogspot.com/2013/01/gaps-diet-and-adrenal-problems_12.html

      Delete
  36. WHY DOEs you captor thing KEEP INSISTING that one has entered things "not matching the pix shown, when IN FACT ONE HAS?????
    Please fix this MOST FRUSTRATING boo-boo
    &
    Please note an email to contact you at when this happens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not sure what the problem is, as you were able to post two comments as you can see above...

      Delete
  37. Hi Sarah, Does this work for hard water? Thank you for your website, I am so impressed with your expertise on health topics.

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    Replies
    1. Yes! We have hard water here where I live, and it works very well!

      Delete
  38. I would like to say thank you for sharing this cool article about apple cider vinegar. This is exactly what I need, Thanks a lot. Keep blogging. :)

    ReplyDelete
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