Monday, August 22, 2011

Peach Blueberry Clafoutis (GAPS-legal, grain- and gluten-free)

Since we are enjoying the summer bounty of local peaches, I came up with this recipe for peach blueberry clafoutis.  It is simple to make and tastes wonderful.  You can eat it warm, but it is especially good chilled.  Leftovers make a great breakfast.  For a special treat, add some whipped cream or ice cream on top.

Peach Blueberry Clafoutis
  1. In a small saucepan, melt one stick of butter.  Turn off heat and add honey. Give it a little stir but don't worry too much about getting it mixed well. Allow to cool.
  2. Wash the peaches and rub gently to remove most of the fuzz.  Then remove the pits and thinly slice the peaches (leaving the skin on).
  3. In a medium bowl, combine eggs, sour cream, nutmeg, salt, and vanilla.  I like to use my immersion blender to mix it all up together, but you could certainly use a whisk or mixer instead.
  4. Add butter/honey mixture and almond flour.  Whisk or blend until smooth. Using the immersion blender is great because it further grinds the almond flour (which doesn't get particularly fine when I grind it in the food processor).
  5. Butter an 8X8 glass dish or two glass pie plates. Arrange the sliced peaches on the bottom of the pan, then sprinkle the blueberries on top.
  6. Pour the liquid mixture over the top of the fruit. (Note: the fruit will float up while it is cooking.)
  7. Bake at 325° for 45-55 minutes, until clafoutis is set in the center and the top is nicely browned.
  8. Allow to cool and then transfer to the fridge. Let chill for several hours and then serve. (You could also eat it warm, but it is much tastier cold.)
*Crispy almonds are nuts that have been soaked in water with a little salt for 12-24 hours and then dried in the dehydrator until crispy (which usually takes about 24 hours at 155 degrees F in my Nesco dehydrator). Soaking the nuts neutralizes phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors. Phytic acid blocks absorption of minerals such as calcium and magnesium; enzyme inhibitors make nuts hard to digest. I make a large batch of crispy nuts, grind them into flour in the food processor (don't grind too long or you will make almond butter instead of flour), and store the flour in the freezer. This way, the flour is always ready when I need it.

**Time-saving tips:

  • For a delicious and easy breakfast throughout the week, double this recipe and cook in either two 8X8 dishes or one 9X13 dish (it will of course take longer to cook in the bigger dish).  Once cooled slightly, scoop into individual glass dishes and store in the refrigerator.  On subsequent mornings, just pull out one of the small glass containers and eat cold.
  • Since the oven will already be heated, you may as well throw in a pack of bacon, some egg muffins, baked bacon and eggs, or even a spaghetti squash for later in the week.  I abhor an empty oven, so I'm always adding more items once it is on.  Bacon bakes very well, especially if you put it on the bottom rack, and it also reheats well for later in the week.
This post is part of Fight Back Friday at Food Renegade, Pennywise Platter at The Nourishing Gourmet, Real Food Wednesday with Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Fat Tuesday at Real Food Forager, Slightly Indulgent Tuesdays at SS&GF and Monday Mania at The Healthy Home Economist

    34 comments:

    1. Oh DROOL! I wish my blender could grind almonds; I'd be all over this!

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    2. You could try substituting 3 Tb coconut flour for the almond flour. Not quite as tasty, but still good. Or you could leave it out altogether!

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    3. This is definitely a recipe for me to try. I think I have everything on hand, even the almond flour. I'm pinning it on Pinterest!

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    4. Yum! I've been looking for a recipe like this...been wanting something to shake up my morning breakfast routine...I imagine it'd be good with a splash of milk!

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    5. Oh my goodness, these look and sound so amazingly delicious! Definitely will be trying these soon! You know, since my family has gone on the GAPS diet, I have discovered/created the most flavorful foods. It makes you have to use your head more in the kitchen, but it seems like every single creation or adaptation of an old favorite is BETTER than the foods I used to eat!

      People think the GAPS diet seems too restrictive, but really it's a comfort zone thing. You are just dealing with all NEW foods, and the best part is it is a whole lot healthier too.

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    6. This is fabulous! I hope you come and share it at FAT TUESDAY!

      http://realfoodforager.com/2011/08/fat-tuesday-august-23-2011/

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    7. I tried to click on "egg muffins" to see that recipe, but it seems to be linked to blogger.com and not to a particular recipe.

      This is great timing, because I have quite a few peaches from the farmers market and was thinking I should bake something to use up more of them. Have you tried grinding almond flour in a coffee grinder? I have done that (it's the only way I've made flour from crispy nuts so far), and it works well, but it is a bit slow because of the small quantity that fits in the grinder. I've only done small portions at a time (for one recipe at a time, such as for your cinnamon almond cookies). Haven't tried in the food processor yet, so not sure how that compares. Just FYI, in case you need finely ground flour in smaller quantity sometimes.

      One question: Can you comment on why you choose 155 as your dehydrating temperature? I've read various things about temperature and enzymes, etc. Just wondering about your take on dehydration temp. Thanks!

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    8. Hi Tara,
      Thanks for letting me know about the broken link. It should be fixed now.

      I actually don't have a coffee grinder as I don't drink coffee (never have except for a couple years in college when I worked at a coffee shop and it was a requirement for knowing I was making good espresso drinks). I have a friend that grinds nuts in her coffee grinder, though.

      I chose 155 for dehydrating because it is fastest. In general, I use almond flour for baking, so there isn't really any benefit in drying at a lower temp (since the nuts will be heated to over 300 degrees during baking anyway). I have occasionally used a lower temp, such as 110, to keep the nuts "raw". We don't eat many nuts raw, though, so I don't usually need to do that. (We used to snack on nuts more, but don't eat them much these days as we noticed we can have a hard time digesting them, especially almonds.) But if you eat them uncooked, then you may as well use a lower temp to dehydrate them to preserve the enzymes.

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    9. Hi Sarah! Found your blog thru google. You have a lot of helpful posts & info I'd love for you to share at my recently new blog link up called Healthy 2day Wednesdays for sharing healthy ideas, going "green" tips, natural remedies, etc. Hope you add this post & others that may fit!

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    10. I love clafoutis! looking forward to trying this one with apples and blueberries!
      Blessings!
      http://bit.ly/ibO3PU

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    11. Thank you for this recipe!!! I haven't yet made any sour cream. Can I substitute it with yogurt?

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    12. Sure, you could use yogurt. It just wouldn't be quite as rich. You could also try kefir cream or creme fraiche.

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    13. I made this using just peaches this week for my aunt's birthday brunch...it was a complete hit! And even better the second day...
      I used 6 medium peaches and omitted the blueberries (only because I needed to use the peaches up...) and substituted 1/4 tsp liquid stevia for the honey...my peaches were so sweet though I think I could have used no sweetener and been just fine...

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    14. Making this the 2nd week in a row! Truly nourishing and fulfilling. I love using up the summer bounty of fruit! My family is not totally on the egg bandwagon yet so I literally ate the entire pan within 2 days. :) Sharing with friends tomorrow!

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    15. Megan, I'm glad this is working out so well for you! As the season progresses, you may want to try the apple/pear version. http://nourishedandnurtured.blogspot.com/2011/02/apple-or-pear-clafoutis-gaps-legal.html

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    16. I just made this yesterday. So good! We were having friends over for dinner, so I served it for dessert. Everyone really liked it! Thanks for a great recipe. : )

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    17. Great, Mindy! Thanks for letting me know.

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    18. I've made this 3 times and we LOVE it!!

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    19. I have made this many times, our favorite is with cherries. (I cover the pan with frozen cherries.) Apple is also good, with plenty of cinnamon. Kefir works great in place of sour cream, as well--makes it less expensive. I always make a double batch and there are never leftovers! People not on GAPS think it's delicious as well and ask for the recipe. Thanks so much!

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    20. That's wonderful, Soliloquy! We love it with apples or pears too (with cinnamon of course). Thanks for letting me know!

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    21. This has become our household favorite. i use coconut flour instead and sometimes change the fruit up. BEst chilled like you said and oh so yummy and great for my 3 yr old to just grab and go :) THanks for the great recipes. look forward to trying more from you.

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    22. Great, Stephanie! I find that when using coconut flour instead of almond flour, I like to use a little less. Thanks for letting me know!

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    23. Really delicious. I may use coconut flour next time. It definitely took longer to bake... 60 or 65 minutes. Thanks so much for the recipe!!

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    24. Hi Rebekah,
      I'm not sure why it took yours longer to bake. Did you use frozen peaches or something else very cold?

      If you use coconut flour instead, reduce the amount to 3 Tb. Enjoy!

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    25. The peaches were partially frozen-- I guess that was it!

      I'm making it with peaches and cranberries for breakfast this morning. :)

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      1. p.s. On my most recent time making this, I used 1/3 cup almond meal and 1 tablespoon coconut flour. I also chopped rather than sliced the peaches. I thought it was the best version I'd tried!

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    26. Replies
      1. Not sure, as it never lasts long enough to freeze in our house.

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    27. the pinit icons are everywhere, I cant see the recipe

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      1. Sorry, I think it is fixed now. Thanks for letting me know!

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    28. This is my all time favorite!! I love it so much, I've made it at least 20 times over the last year. The only problem with it is that it is SO GOOD I can't seem to make it last more than 12 hours at my house. :) And I don't like to share it.

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      1. Thanks for letting me know, Leigh Anne. I love this recipe too!

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